Venture Desktop’s Post

The Bifurcation of Healthcare

David Galbraith of Anthemis Capital wrote a very thought provoking two-part essay over at Exponential View this weekend focused on why the current pandemic is pulling forward a lot of already in flight societal changes and how he sees six specific segments of our world changing in the aftermath of the pandemic.

I highly recommend reading both installments but wanted to focus on one specific section that caught my eye here:

For services infrastructure, a major trend in things such as healthcare may be decentralization, where putting vulnerable, sick people all together in one hospital, riddled with antibiotic-resistant bacteria may be a bad idea. Mixing patients with severe intensive care needs with people with elective procedures may also lead to a separation into different providers and a whole swathe of visits to general practitioners can be replaced by online telemedicine services.

Over the last couple of years, I have had a personal thesis that what we think of today as “digital fitness and wellness” (Peloton, Headspace, etc.) will eventually evolve to eat into a significant portion of the broader digital healthcare system. I’ve laid out that idea in the attached graphic.

The quick explanation of that thesis:

Over the last 10 years, we have moved from products that simply track what we do, to products centered around that driving engagement through content and community. The next 10 years of consumer health and wellness will be defined by companies that take the best of what we’ve learned over the last decade and pair that with advanced monitoring, improved identity management systems, immersive experiences, and host of other newly catalyzed technologies.

Companies like Whoop (I’m an obsessed user), Oura (admirer from a distance), and Tonal (TechNexus is a small investor) hint at what we can expect. Over time, the solutions offered by these companies and others will become better, faster, and cheaper to drive broader access and improved outcomes for a massive number of people who are currently both underserved and overserved by current healthcare infrastructure — bigger market opportunities enabling the creation of bigger companies all along the way.

That’s just one piece of the unbundling, as there are now real economic/behavioral tailwinds to break up the status quo and unlock the “consumerization of healthcare” that has always been obvious but a bit out of reach.

I’m writing a longer post on this for this weekend (or more likely next if parental duties intervene over the next couple of days ) but wanted to share some thoughts and useful links in real time here.

↳ Naomi Shah – Unbundling Healthcare
↳ Alex Danco – Bundling, Unbundling, and the Future of Healthcare Innovation
↳ Sam Myers – The Consumerization of Healthcare
↳ Nikhil Krishnan – Healthcare Consumerization
↳ Adode – Consumerization of Healthcare

If you have anything to share on this, please feel free to shoot me a DM or hit me up on Twitter!

——

#wellness / #health ____ The Bifurcation of Healthcare

David Galbraith of Anthemis Capital wrote a very thought provoking two-part essay over at Exponential View this weekend focused on why the current pandemic is pulling forward a lot of already in flight societal changes and how he sees six specific segments of our world changing in the aftermath of the pandemic.

I highly recommend reading both installments but wanted to focus on one specific section that caught my eye here:

For services infrastructure, a major trend in things such as healthcare may be decentralization, where putting vulnerable, sick people all together in one hospital, riddled with antibiotic-resistant bacteria may be a bad idea. Mixing patients with severe intensive care needs with people with elective procedures may also lead to a separation into different providers and a whole swathe of visits to general practitioners can be replaced by online telemedicine services.

Over the last couple of years, I have had a personal thesis that what we think of today as "digital fitness and wellness" (Peloton, Headspace, etc.) will eventually evolve to eat into a significant portion of the broader digital healthcare system. I've laid out that idea in the attached graphic.

The quick explanation of that thesis:

Over the last 10 years, we have moved from products that simply track what we do, to products centered around that driving engagement through content and community. The next 10 years of consumer health and wellness will be defined by companies that take the best of what we've learned over the last decade and pair that with advanced monitoring, improved identity management systems, immersive experiences, and host of other newly catalyzed technologies.

Companies like Whoop (I'm an obsessed user), Oura (admirer from a distance), and Tonal (TechNexus is a small investor) hint at what we can expect. Over time, the solutions offered by these companies and others will become better, faster, and cheaper to drive broader access and improved outcomes for a massive number of people who are currently both underserved and overserved by current healthcare infrastructure — bigger market opportunities enabling the creation of bigger companies all along the way.

That's just one piece of the unbundling, as there are now real economic/behavioral tailwinds to break up the status quo and unlock the "consumerization of healthcare" that has always been obvious but a bit out of reach.

I'm writing a longer post on this for this weekend (or more likely next if parental duties intervene over the next couple of days ) but wanted to share some thoughts and useful links in real time here.

↳ Naomi Shah – Unbundling Healthcare
↳ Alex Danco – Bundling, Unbundling, and the Future of Healthcare Innovation
↳ Sam Myers – The Consumerization of Healthcare
↳ Nikhil Krishnan – Healthcare Consumerization
↳ Adode – Consumerization of Healthcare

If you have anything to share on this, please feel free to shoot me a DM or hit me up on Twitter!

——

#wellness / #health
By: via Venture Desktop